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Alberto Aguirre/Chicago Police Department photo

Three DUI arrests, revoked license — still on sheriff's payroll

Smoke and fire from the explosion of an Israeli strike rise over Gaza City on Tuesday. Israel escalated its military campaign against Hamas on Tuesday, striking symbols of the group's control in Gaza and firing tank shells that shut down the strip's only power plant in the heaviest bombardment in the fighting so far. | AP Photo

Lawmakers scrambling to seal $225 million aid package for Israel

WASHINGTON — Democratic and Republican members of Congress are scrambling to seal a $225 million boost to Israel's Iron Dome missile defense system before they break this week for a month-long recess.

Former Illinois Gov. George Ryan. | AP Photo

Ryan's hope: Help abolish death penalty nationwide

Ryan claims that, in the long run, the death penalty winds up costing the taxpayers more than a life sentence in a maximum-security facility — once you parse the legal costs and special privileges affixed to the appeals process — as well as the chance for error as the case travels from its inception, investigation and appeal, he said.

 

Three Ways ACA is affecting Business

More often than not, when healthcare reform is brought up, the impact and the interests of businesses are lumped together, as if each faces with the same challenges as the next.

Obama dining with four Kansas City letter writers

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is taking four Kansas City residents out to dinner to chew over the concerns of heartland Americans, with little time remaining for action on pressing issues before Congress begins its August recess.

Bruce Rauner is getting a boost from his economic plan, new polls show. | AP Photo

Rauner pads lead against Quinn in new poll

Gov. Pat Quinn is facing an increasingly uphill battle against Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner, a new Reboot Illinois/We Ask America poll shows.

Chicago cop wins $540K suit vs. sergeant accused of taunting him

Officer Detlef Sommerfield sued the city and his former boss, Sgt. Lawrence C. Knasiak, in 2008, accusing Knasiak of taunting him for years with anti-Semitic and racist remarks, according to a federal court complaint. On Monday, a federal jury awarded $540,000 to Sommerfield.

Pro-Israeli demonstrators aim their signs at the pro-Palestinian supporters across from 100 West Randolph Street on Monday afternoon in Chicago. | Michael Schmidt/Sun-Times

Supporters of Israel and Palestinian backers speak out at rallies

Supporters of Israel and Palestinian backers squared off on opposite sides of a downtown street Monday, pointing fingers about who’s to blame for ongoing violence in the Gaza Strip. Hundreds packed the square outside the Thompson Center, waving Israeli flags while public speakers condemned Hamas, the militant Palestinian faction in control of Gaza that has called for the destruction of Israel. 

In 2013, a U.S. District Court judge ruled that New York City's controversial stop-and-frisk policy was unconstitutional. When Bill de Blasio took the mayor’s office, he fulfilled his campaign promise by moving quickly to reform stop-and-frisk. But three weeks ago, de Blasio found himself defending his decision to dial down stop-and-frisk. | Christopher Gregory/Getty Images

Ending the carnage on Chicago’s streets will take more than talk

If you had to give up some of your personal freedom to reduce the deadly violence in your neighborhood, would you? Would you be willing, for instance, to put up with the indignity that comes with a stop-and-frisk policing strategy?

Who is benefiting from the Lawndale Diabetes Project?

Gerry Allen, a resident of North Lawndale on Chicago’s West Side, suffered for years with unmanaged diabetes. But, thanks to an expanded community health initiative launched in April 2012 between a local hospital  and an insurance provider, he did something he thought he’d never do.

File Photo. I John H. White~Sun-Times

Extra alarm over CPS preference in firefighter hiring

Mayor Rahm Emanuel barely caused a ripple of reaction two years ago when he announced Chicago Public School graduates would be given a leg up when applying for city jobs. But now that the city is preparing to take applications for firefighters for the first time in a decade, Emanuel’s “CPS preference” policy is sparking an outcry from some city residents who say it discriminates against graduates of Catholic and other private schools.